The Healing Benefits of Solomon’s Seal Tea

The wildcrafted root of the herb Solomon’s Seal (polygonatum biflorum or multiflorum) is widely known and used in tincture form (internally) or as a salve (externally). However, when prepared as a tea (i.e. herbal infusion) the root has unique healing benefits, as compared to tincture or salve.

The information available on the Internet about using Solomon’s Seal as a tea is not entirely accurate, especially suggested dosage amounts. The purpose of this article is to clarify the potential healing benefits of Solomon’s Seal tea for ProBiology Gut Dosage certain health issues, including its proper preparation and dosage.

A tea makes the best use of the plant’s excellent demulcent qualities (also referred to as mucilaginous or muco-protective). Mucilage is a polysaccharide substance obtained from the roots or seeds of a plant. A mucilaginous or demulcent herb is viscous and gelatinous, and thus protective and soothing to the mucus membranes and other irritated or inflamed internal tissues of the body.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF SOLOMON’S SEAL TEA

Expectorant

One of the important properties of Solomon’s Seal is that of an expectorant. If one has a stubborn dry cough with sticky mucus that is difficult to expel, for example, the herb may help to loosen that mucus in the lungs, lessening congestion. While it is particularly effective for a dry cough, the tea can be used to treat any type of cough, respiratory infection, or lung congestion. And remember, because it is also a demulcent, it coats the throat and helps relieve the irritation causing a cough. Historically, the tea has even been used to treat such conditions as tuberculosis, pulmonary consumption, and bleeding of the lungs, but these types of uses must necessarily be discussed with your doctor or health practitioner.

Anti-inflammatory

Solomon’s Seal is an excellent anti-inflammatory. It contains allantoin, which is important in the reduction of inflammation, such as that caused by arthritis. The tea can be useful in lessening the severity of gastrointestinal conditions, including ulceration, indigestion, heartburn, irritated or inflamed digestive tract, and diarrhea, all of which can be caused in part by inflammation.